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ovid medicamina faciei femineae

Oxford World's Classics: Ovid: The Love Poems. Johnson explains her translation choices for key terms, which is always welcome from a translator and especially helpful for any reader without extensive Latin training. [14] He includes the young puella (17) and a respectable, married matrona (nupta, 26) adjacent to the traditional use of cultus by meretrices. discite quae faciem commendet cura, puellae, et quo sit vobis forma tuenda modo. Eds A. D. Melville and Edward J. Kenney (2008) Oxford World's Classics: Ovid: Fasti. The first, “Now and then … making-over a woman,” introduces a topic that resurfaces in the commentaries, namely the similarities between ancient and modern beauty practices and attitudes toward physical appearance. De medicamine faciei, auch bezeichnet mit dem Titel Medicamina faciei femineae, ist ein pharmakologisch-kosmetisches Lehrgedicht des römischen Dichters Publius Ovidius Naso. The texts assembled in Ovid on Cosmetics are often discussed together, since they address similar topics and were composed in relatively close succession. The stated aim is to preserve beauty (forma tueri), from deterioration, one assumes, rather than uplift it. Do you have an idea to share with your friends? Search. Exploring female beauty and cosmeceuticals, with particular emphasis on the concept of cultus, the poem presents five practical recipes for treatments for Roman women. Ancient testimony on related topics, by authors from Alexis to Vitruvius, gives evidence of the range of ancient views of beauty. Medicamina Faciei Femineae. The poem falls at the beginning of Ovid’s … Vite ! The section “Ovid on cultus, munditia, and ars ” introduces and defines the three key terms in Ovid’s discussions of beauty. The Medicamina Faciei Femineae is a didactic elegy that showcases an early example of Ovid's trademark combination of poetic instruction and trivial subject matter. Ovid on Cosmetics: Medicamina Faciei Femineae and Related Texts: Johnson, Marguerite: Amazon.sg: Books [1] Rosati, 1985, 42f; Watson, 2001, 457; Johnson, 2016, xii. Despite enabling female cultus and adornment through his instruction, the praeceptor amoris maintains a level of transparency which undermines female agency, so as not to disadvantage his male audience. [21] Gamel, 2012, 339, 353; Toohey, 1996, 162. The Ars Amatoria, which is often paired with the Medicamina, is addressed to women, but has Ovid’s male audience at its core. P. Ovidius Naso. She consistently resolves such difficulties by explaining that they are the result of rhetoric, as here: “The key to understanding Ovid’s different attitudes to male cultus … is in his rhetorical imperative” (p. 135). 23-26 (on male cultus). 65–6). Comparisons have been drawn with Virgil’s Georgics, but, as discussed by Johnson, the Medicamina values ingenuity, and tackles a more ‘trivial’ didactic subject than the practical content of Virgil’s pastoral didactic. However, for Ovid’s Augustan audience cultus refers to beautification. [21], Then why advise? Send us a message and follow the Durham University Classics Society on Twitter (@DUClassSoc) and Facebook (@DUClassics Society) to keep up with this blog and our other adventures! [27] Cf. This question introduces us to a second narrative. I have elected to use discite to mirror the opening line of the poem, and introduce the didactic section. Rimell construes this as a reference to the poem’s mirror motif. The major contribution of this work is that it makes accessible a wide range of evidence about ancient beautification. These are three big topics to fit into fewer than 200 pages, and where Johnson cannot be exhaustive she points to important issues and offers interested readers direction for further study. 99–100). Ovid Written 2 millennia ago, Ovid's Medicamina Faciei Femineae ( Cosmetics for the Female Face ) provides a unique insight into Roman dermatological practices and attitudes toward beauty. In this specific instance, another productive line of analysis could be comparison with Tibullus 1.8, which displays a different approach to male cultus : the (male) Marathus has adorned himself excessively to attract the (female) Pholoe, who herself looks lovely even with an “uncultivated face” ( inculto … ore, 1.8.15). [29] This also reaffirms that Ovid’s skincare advice is aimed at rejuvenation. Ovid Medicamina Faciei. Sterility is a result of, indeed, a lack of cultivation, but also of age. The commentary on the relatively neglected Medicamina Faciei Femineae may be the most welcome portion, as previously Rosati’s 1985 Italian edition was the only modern commentary available. R. Ehwald. 351–6 is a commonly cited instance of this. For the Sabine women mentioned in the praeceptor’s aetiological description in lines 11–16, cultus refers to pastoral cultivation, as in the Georgics. In the hundred extant verses, Ovid… In the case of the aforementioned facial treatment, she draws the reader’s attention to the sexual connotations of key verbs and the “overtly sexual implications due to the imagery of the young men with their muscular arms pounding away” (p. 71). The hypocrisy here does not amount to shaming women, but to exposing them. Rather than money, however, Ovid’s capital is poetic skill. The idea that the praeceptor himself has seen this technique offers an element of certainty, and, in the perfect tense, suggests a one-off incident.

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